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Dunholme Village

CHURCHES AND RELIGION

Background picture taken of havesting in a corn field on Honeyholes Lane August 2014

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The Parish Church of Dunholme is dedicated to St Chad.

There has been a church on this site for at least 700 years and there may have been a worshipping community in the village for even longer.  The fact that the Doomsday Book (1087) makes no mention of the church in Dunholme does not necessarily mean that no church existed.  It is one of 31 churches dedicated to St Chad, a native of Northumbria


SUNDAY SERVICES WITHIN THE BENEFICE DURING JANUARY

St Chad’s Church Notices

 

Knit and Natter

Don’t forget to come along to the monthly “drop in” at St. Chad’s Church on the third Wednesday of every month (next is 15th January) between 9.30 am and 11.00 am.

 Open to all whether you can knit, crochet or just natter?

Please feel free to bring along your own items or join with us in supporting local charities. All welcome and child friendly.

 

 threechurchespray

The three churches in Welton, Dunholme and Scothern will be praying for our communities, street by street, including any groups, organisations, schools that may be on that street through each month. You don’t have to tread the pavements to take part!!

 

 During January St Mary’s, St Chad’s and St Germain’s churches will be praying for Anderson, Kneeland, Merleswen, Paynell and The Granthams.

 If you would like to join us or just know a bit more before you make up your mind, please contact Glyn on 861907, Dave on 860986 or Yvonne on 862258

 

 From St Chad’s Registers

 We share in the sadness of those who mourn the death of a loved one, remembering those whose funeral has taken place, or cremated remains have been laid to rest recently:

 

 4 December June Taylor

 

‘Encounter’ at St Chad’s Church, Dunholme

 Do you like singing Christian Worship songs of all kinds? Then why not pop along to an “Encounter” evening at St Chad’s Church in Dunholme on the fourth Sunday of a month from 7pm.

It is a very relaxed, informal atmosphere where you can join in with the songs or just sit and listen. We also may have a few verses from the bible or a poem as well as some time for private prayer and reflection and maybe encounter God. The evening usually lasts about an hour with time afterwards for refreshments and time to chat with one another.

We look forward to welcoming you so why not give it a try?

 

 Dave Farley (Tel 01673 860986), Helen Loving (01673 861714)

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Rev Adam Watson

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 http://www.welton-methodist-church.co.uk/

Rev Andy Burrows

telephone: 01673 862486

email: minister@welton-methodist-church.co.uk

Welton & Dunholme Methodist Chapel

A Lord’s Prayer for Justice. 1996, from Ron Rolheiser.

 

 “In the world’s schema of things, survival of the fittest is the rule. In God’s schema, survival of the weakest is the rule. God always stands on the side of the weak and it is there, among the weak, that we find God.

Given the truth of that, let me risk a commentary on the Lord’s Prayer:

 

 Our Father … who always stands with the weak, the powerless, the poor, the abandoned, the sick, the aged, the very young, and those who, by victim of circumstance, bear the heat of the day.

 

 Who art in heaven … where everything will be reversed, where the first will be last and the last will be first, but where all will be well and every manner of being will be well.

 

 Hallowed by thy name … may we always acknowledge your holiness, respecting that your ways are not our ways, your standards are not our standards. May the reverence we give your name pull us out of the selfishness that prevents us from seeing the pain of our neighbour.

 

 Your kingdom come … help us to create a world where, beyond our own needs and hurts, we will do justice, love tenderly, and walk humbly with you and each other.

 

 Your will be done … open our freedom to let you in so that the complete mutuality that characterises your life might flow through our veins and thus the life that we help generate may radiate your equal love for all and your special love for the poor.

 

 On earth as in heaven … may the work of our hands, the temples and structures we build in this world, reflect the temple and the structure of your glory so that the joy, graciousness, tenderness, and justice of heaven will show forth within all of our structures on earth.

 

 Give … life and love to us and help us to see always everything as gift. Help us to know that nothing comes to us by right and that we must give because we have been given to. Help us realise that we must give to the poor, not because they need it, but because our own health depends upon our giving to them.

 

 Us … the truly plural us. Give not just to our own but to everyone, including those who are very different than the narrow us. Give your gifts to all of us equally.

 

 This day  … not tomorrow. Do not let us push things off into some indefinite future so that we can continue to live justified lives in the face of injustice because we can use present philosophical, political, economic, logistic, and practical difficulties as an excuse for inactivity.

 

 Our daily bread … so that each person in the world my have enough food, enough clean water, enough clean air, adequate health care, and sufficient access to education so as to have the sustenance for a healthy life. Teach us to give from our sustenance and not just from our surplus.

 

 And forgive us our trespasses … forgive us our blindness towards our neighbour, our obsessive self-preoccupation, our racism, our sexism, and our incurable propensity to worry only about ourselves and our own. Forgive us our capacity to watch the evening news and do nothing about it.

 

 As we forgive those who trespass against us … help us to forgive those who victimise us. Help us to mellow out in spirit, to not grow bitter with age, to forgive the imperfect parents and systems that wounded, cursed, and ignored us.

 

 And do not put us to the test … do not judge us only by whether we have fed the hungry, given clothing to the naked, visited the sick, or tried to mend the systems that victimised the poor. Spare us this test for none of us can stand before this gospel scrutiny. Give us, instead, more days to mend our ways, our selfishness, and our systems.

 

 But deliver us from evil … that is, from the blindness that lets us continue to participate in anonymous systems within which we need not see who gets less as we get more.

 

 Amen.”  Rev Helen July 2020

 

  https://ronrolheiser.com/a-lords-prayer-for-justice/#.Xt_OeS_Mw_U

 

 

 

 

HISTORY OF THE METHODIST CHAPEL


Our Chapel was founded by a young Wesleyan preacher by the name of John Hannah in 1815.  He was the third son of a local coal merchant whose parents were both Wesleyan Methodists, so it is probably not a surprise that he became a Minister himself at a young age in 1814, when he began preaching in the villages surrounding Lincoln.  He was noted as an impressive preacher and a ready public speaker of unusual eloquence and ability who twice held the office of President of the Wesleyan Conference, first in 1842 and then again in 1851.  He travelled extensively, twice visiting the United States with the Wesleyan Conference of Great Britain as a representative of English Methodism along with numerous positions in the United Kingdom, both as a Minister and a theological tutor at parishes as varied as Stoke Newington, Hoxton and Didsbury in Yorkshire.

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John Hannah